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  1. #11
    leofelix is offline Member
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    I've just changed my mind I think I'd better to read Donald Duck

  2. #12
    seti is offline Member
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    Talking

    Quote Originally Posted by leofelix View Post
    I've just changed my mind I think I'd better to read Donald Duck
    try Hittchikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams published by Pan. Ignore the film it was rubbish, but this would suit those with a sense of irony or the FarSide Books by Gary Larson, very funny cartoons, but you have to look to get the point of many of them

  3. #13
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    I am currently reading "Ubuntu Kung Fu" by Keir Thomas ISBN-10 1-934356-22-0 . The link is here ( Ubuntu Kung Fu | O'Reilly Media ). I run Ubuntu in a virtual partition - a good way to study it and experiment with it. If that sounds tempting to you, follow the instructions here ( http://www.winvistaclub.com/forum/wi...partition.html ). I recommend to use Virtual box.
    Last edited by whs; 15th February 2009 at 19:32.

  4. #14
    leofelix is offline Member
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    Thumbs up About DNA:)

    Quote Originally Posted by seti View Post
    try Hittchikers Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams published by Pan. Ignore the film it was rubbish, but this would suit those with a sense of irony or the FarSide Books by Gary Larson, very funny cartoons, but you have to look to get the point of many of them
    I like Science Fiction a lot, the book you talked about is famous in Italy too, they translated it into "Guida galattica per autostoppisti".
    I never watched the movie.
    I would thank you for your suggestion, seti, cause I didn't know that Douglas Adams (aka DNA) was popular as a humorist writer and musician too and I'd like to go deep to the heart of the subject.

    Did I ever tell you I like English and American Literature?
    I studied it both at secondary school and at University too (many years ago unfortunately)

    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guida_g...pisti_(romanzo)

  5. #15
    seti is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by leofelix View Post
    I like Science Fiction a lot, the book you talked about is famous in Italy too, they translated it into "Guida galattica per autostoppisti".
    I never watched the movie.
    I would thank you for your suggestion, seti, cause I didn't know that Douglas Adams (aka DNA) was popular as a humorist writer and musician too and I'd like to go deep to the heart of the subject.

    Did I ever tell you I like English and American Literature?
    I studied it both at secondary school and at University too (many years ago unfortunately)

    http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guida_galattica_per_gli_autostoppisti_(romanzo)
    If you really love English Literature then one book you should really read for its beauty and forget about the sexuality of some of the content is Lady Chatterly by DH Lawernce, who shares the same birth day as me, and for poetry read Warlock of Love by Marc Bolan where the word are use in different and unusual combinations and for Science fiction The Children of Dawn by John Wydaham (he also wrote Day of the Triffids) which is in my humble opinion one of the greatest books ever written

  6. #16
    leofelix is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by seti View Post
    If you really love English Literature then one book you should really read for its beauty and forget about the sexuality of some of the content is Lady Chatterly by DH Lawernce, who shares the same birth day as me, and for poetry read Warlock of Love by Marc Bolan where the word are use in different and unusual combinations and for Science fiction The Children of Dawn by John Wydaham (he also wrote Day of the Triffids) which is in my humble opinion one of the greatest books ever written
    I read Lady Chatterley's lover some years ago, I know it was first published in Florence and was considered outragious when was published in Great Britain (perhaps Queen Victoria 'ghost' still influenced english way of thinking). A master piece.

    So you was born in 1885 , you look like so young...

    I'll look for Warlock of Love, I never read these poems.. do not why now I'm thinking to The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by Th. Sterne Eliot (I know he was a north american "fugitive").. never read it or for example The Waste Land?
    When I spoke a quite satisfactory english I read it in your native language.
    Really difficult to understand, but what can you understand in poetry?
    You have to listen for your feeling first if you want to "undesterstand" poetry I think.
    Of course I know John Wydaham, a great writer.

    Thank you seti

  7. #17
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    Fun thread idea!!!

    Not including the readings I have for my course work nor the dictionary that seems to never leave my side, my two current reads are <a href="http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1964/sartre-bio.html">Jean-Paul Sartre's</a> book titled <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=mqRkAAAAMAAJ&q=sartre+literature+and+exis tentialism&dq=sartre+literature+and+existentialism &ei=d4GfSev7N5jEM4Sm2IoC&client=firefox-a&pgis=1">Literature and Existentialism</a> and a book suggested to me by my father that he read some time ago titled <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=dlG1NUtKoZgC&q=harry+bright&dq=harry+brig ht&ei=ToOfSYuvJpOUMZLw2IoC&client=firefox-a&pgis=1">The Secrets of Harry Bright</a> by Joseph Wambaugh.

    I will note in Sartre's book I'm stubbornly trudging through what I've read so far and at times reversing for "do-overs" just to understand the topic but Wambaugh's is really turning out to be a lot of fun!

  8. #18
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    Being a nautical history buff, I am currently reading CAPTAIN OF OLD IRONSIDES: The Life and Fighting Times of Isaac Hull and the U. S. Frigate Constitution by Bruce Grant.
    Very entertaining reading...while it is fact, it reads like a Hornblower novel.
    This one is out of print, but if anyone is looking for used books online, www.abebooks.com is your friend.
    Last edited by James; 22nd February 2009 at 03:54.

  9. #19
    seti is offline Member
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    Red face

    before this went down I mentioned that I was reading a book on Egyptian Queens, as ti turned out that didn't tell me anything that I didn't know already. But in a reply about pyramids I gave an answer of them only really being around for about 200-300 years. I was partically right, but further research means that I have to correct my answer and say that Pyramids were built in Egypt for approximately 770 years from 2630- 1860. I have this information from The Encyclopedia of Ancient Egypt edited by Helen Strudwick which I am presently reading

  10. #20
    leofelix is offline Member
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    I'm reading a mail which a friend of mine sent me some days ago.

    His mail arrived today

    Google google what are you doing?

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