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  1. #1
    riteshtechie's Avatar
    riteshtechie is offline Software Developer
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    Default Google Public DNS - A speed up (all that you want to know))

    Google Public DNS is a free, global Domain Name System (DNS) resolution service, that you can use as an alternative to your current DNS provider.

    Got Confused…Ok let me explain this is in simple non technical terms (as far as I can). You use Internet right. So how do you access any website, by entering its domain name like beingPC.com in any of your favorite browser and hitting enter. But the inside story is different.

    When you try to access any webpage in our case beingPC.com your computer resolves this domain name (website URL) into IP Address with the help of the Domain Name Server. By default, Windows uses your ISP’s DNS server.

    So in short, to open a website Windows need to resolve the domain name to IP Address by looking it in Domain Server provided by your ISP. So the faster your PC resolve the faster you get connected. So this is where Google Public DNS helps, it helps you resolves the domain names into IP Address faster than other.

    Setup Google DNS on your Computer

    If you would like to setup Google DNS on your Computer than follow the steps below:

    • Go to Start > Control Panel
    • Select Network And Internet > Network & Sharing Center
    • In the left pane click on Change Adapter Settings
    • Right Click on Local Area Connections and select properties
    • Adapter setting
    • Select Internet Protocol Version 4 and click on Properties
    • Now set the Ip Addresses as below


    Preferred DNS Server: 8.8.8.8.

    Alternate DNS Server: 8.8.4.4
    So what were your results did you got any speed?? Share your thoughts

  2. #2
    seti is offline Member
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    Thank you for this information. I think I understand it but for the moment I shall leave things as they are and wait until Ramesh come up with the tweak in UWT ( sorry Ramesh but you're good at these things) and it that way.

  3. #3
    iMav's Avatar
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    ^^ DNS settings cannot be done using 3rd party tools afaik. Your network has to be manually configured

  4. #4
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    MrMBerman is offline Senior Member
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    Google does it again, another step towards world dominance, and another chance for Google to snoop on your every online movement. I'm not too happy about the privacy issues in the Google small print. I personally will pass on the Google DNS servers and stick with OpenDNS who have served me well for the last 3 years.

    Don't be surprised if Google tries to gobble up OpenDNS some time soon.

  5. #5
    iMav's Avatar
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    ^^ Quite a genuine concern about Google stepping into the DNS space. And it's definite that this will be used for servicing more targeted ads. OpenDNS creator has made a post regarding Goolge DNS -- OpenDNS Blog Some thoughts on Google DNS

  6. #6
    Cithel is offline Senior Member
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    I'm moving away from Google more and more. A while ago they were (like Apple and Microsoft were) a very innovative group of very savvy technical people without a business plan. They did what they did out of passion and enthusiasm or so it seemed to me. Recently I have been getting the impression that they are rapidly moving to a "business first" model.

    I'm hesitant to give Google yet another method for tracking what I do. Tying DNS requests to ad-sense, Google analytics and the trackable cookie UID they have been using for years is a bit to Orwellian for me. If they are actually doing it, I don't know that they are. I'm not bashing Google and maybe I'm just being paranoid about one company having to much information, but for now I'm holding off on this one.

    Either way, thanks for the tip Riteshtechie.

    ---------- Post added at 08:50 AM ---------- Previous post was at 08:39 AM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by iMav View Post
    ^^ DNS settings cannot be done using 3rd party tools afaik. Your network has to be manually configured
    If you are running DHCP it would require a manual setting in the DHCP server. If not running DHCP it would be reasonably easy to create a script to change the DNS servers via something like netsh.

  7. #7
    iMav's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cithel View Post

    If you are running DHCP it would require a manual setting in the DHCP server. If not running DHCP it would be reasonably easy to create a script to change the DNS servers via something like netsh.
    One would still need to go into command prompt afaik. Making a click to change script would still be a task. I had come across this long back when I was trying something with my router and auto configuring IPs -- Automating TCP/IP Networking on Clients:Part 5: Scripting DNS on Clients

  8. #8
    Cithel is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by iMav View Post
    One would still need to go into command prompt afaik. Making a click to change script would still be a task. I had come across this long back when I was trying something with my router and auto configuring IPs -- Automating TCP/IP Networking on Clients:Part 5: Scripting DNS on Clients
    That could very well be correct, I've never tested it. I use group policy for things like that. Since in a manual config it would be a one time only job, it doesn't seem worth the effort. I might play with it today just to see what happens if it is scripted as a click to apply type of thing. I would think at the very least UAC would pop up. Interesting!

    Sorry for the off topic post.

  9. #9
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    I use dns provided by ISP, so I don't understand what is the advantage, except a relative speed in some moments.

  10. #10
    leofelix is offline Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Max_Payne View Post
    I use dns provided by ISP, so I don't understand what is the advantage, except a relative speed in some moments.
    Maybe a privacy concern If I'm not wrong

    https://www.grc.com/x/ne.dll?bh0bkyd2


    The string of text above is known as your Internet connection's "reverse DNS." The end of the string is probably a domain name related to your ISP. This will be common to all customers of this ISP. But the beginning of the string uniquely identifies your Internet connection. The question is: Is the beginning of the string an "account ID" that is uniquely and permanently tied to you, or is it merely related to your current public IP address and thus subject to change?
    The concern is that any web site can easily retrieve this unique "machine name" (just as we have) whenever you visit. It may be used to uniquely identify you on the Internet. In that way it's like a "supercookie" over which you have no control. You can not disable, delete, or change it. Due to the rapid erosion of online privacy, and the diminishing respect for the sanctity of the user, we wanted to make you aware of this possibility. Note also that reverse DNS may disclose your geographic location.
    The Big Brother is Watching You:-)

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