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Thread: Win 10 dual boot issue

  1. #1
    Naplesjoe is offline New Member
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    Default Win 10 dual boot issue

    I'm new to this site today and thought I would drop a note expanding on a similar post. I too partitioned my hard drive and installed the Win10 on the new. All worked surprisingly well for several days until an update came through for Win 10. You can expect a lot of these and that was no surprise. However, as another poster mentioned, Win 10 often leaves you with nothing but a blue screen and no indication that anything is happening. Not only with the initial install but also some of the updates.

    While setting idle, the machine obviously timed out and went ahead with the re-boot after the update was installed. When I returned to the computer I was presented with the initial dual boot screen but the Win 8.1 tab just rebooted the machine one more time. That's when I discovered Win 8.1 was no longer an option. Not only that, but all references to the Win 8 partition was gone. Using partition magic, the drive was there however the letter designator was changed to a question mark and marked "inaccessible". I attempted to reassign the drive letter but no luck.

    I ended up reloading the system with the recent image file that I made prior to installing Win10. And then (probably foolishly) reinstalled Win 10 on a partition again.



    Moral of my story is I would first recommend that loading in a dual boot configuration be very careful. Second, if you do, do not let the system re-boot itself after an update, and be sure to remember which operating system was in use when you last used the computer. If you choose the wrong OS at restart I think you may have the same issue. I would never let the computer set unattended while Win 10 is running in a dual boot system. I will start Win 10, play with it for a while and then restart to Win 8 before shutting the computer down for the night.

    Finally I can only guess that when Win 10 updates, it modifies the Boot.ini in a way it no longer allows the other system to start. Probably swapping drive letters or something like that. This part is over my head.

    I want to add, that in all other aspects Win 10 seems to be a very stable and well written software. I think it will be very popular. I have found everything I have loaded to date runs fine. Even my Win TV device started right up after the usual configuration.

    Sorry for this post being so long but I wanted to explain as well as I could.

  2. #2
    hackerman1 is offline Senior Member
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    I have had similar problems while testing a new operating system (Windows Server-2012) on a computer with dual / multi-boot.
    Your problem has probably nothing to do with the operating system you last used,
    but rather which operating system you have as the main (boot) system.
    Microsoft usually tries to let the newest system take over as "boot-system",
    and that can cause problems if the "new" system is an unstable betaversion / technical preview....

    An easy fix is to use fx. EasyBCD and make the "old" system the "boot-system" (active) again.
    After having done that you have to copy bootmgr from the root of the "new" system to the root of the "old" system, fx. from D:\ to C:\, otherwise you will not be able to boot the "new" system because the "old" system doesnīt recognize the "new".
    Last edited by hackerman1; 10th March 2015 at 12:57.

  3. #3
    Kapil Arya's Avatar
    Kapil Arya is offline Microsoft MVP
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    Hello and welcome to TWC,

    Since Windows 10 isn't stable right now, you must opt to try it on Virtualization instead of dual boot Although, it seems that your boot manager is missing older edition entry. As suggested by hackerman1, you can also use EasyBCD to add missing entry to boot manager. Plus you need to set your older system as default OS while booting. The result may be classical style boot manager, but issues will be suppressed.

    Good luck

  4. #4
    Arun Kumar's Avatar
    Arun Kumar is offline MVP Alumni
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    Virtualization is better as Kapil said. Windows 10 is not yet stable. It should not be installed on systems that people use for working. It's just for testing. Once the final version is out, it will be easier to dual boot. Won't say there won't be problems but then, we can narrow down the issues and work on it.

  5. #5
    hackerman1 is offline Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kapil Arya View Post
    Although, it seems that your boot manager is missing older edition entry.
    The bootmanager is probably not the problem, but an unstable O/S (Technical Preview).

    If you fx. have W7 and then install W10-TP as a second O/S,
    and W10-TP becomes the new "boot-system" (active), then the bootmanager has all it needs to boot W7.

    But if you use fx. EasyBCD and make the "old" system the "boot-system" (active) again,
    the bootmanager in W7 does not have any information about W10-TP,
    and as a result it cannot boot W10-TP.
    That is why you have to copy bootmgr from W10-TP to W7.

    Btw, I wrote BCDEdit when I actually meant EasyBCD, I was very tired when I posted....
    Thanks Kapil, it seems you understood which program I referred to...
    I have corrected my first post above.

    You find EasyBCD here: EasyBCD - NeoSmart Technologies

    Itīs an excellent program for managing the boot-settings, and it can also boot "everything".
    If you want fx. Windows & Linux as dual / multi-boot, then EasyBCD can handle it.
    I recommend it, I have used it for several years and I have never had any problems.
    Kapil Arya likes this.

  6. #6
    hackerman1 is offline Senior Member
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    Thanks Kapil, Iīm glad to see that you appreciated my post.

    I noticed that my first post above
    Quote Originally Posted by hackerman1 View Post
    Microsoft usually tries to let the newest system take over as "boot-system",
    and that can cause problems if the "new" system is an unstable betaversion / technical preview....
    was a bit unclear (I was tired when I posted...) so here is a clarification...

    What I meant was: The bootmanager in a previous system (fx. W7) does not have any information about W10-TP,
    and as a result it cannot boot W10-TP.
    Since the newest operating system is the only system that can boot "itself", logically it has to be the "boot-system" (active).
    Itīs just too bad that Microsoft doesnīt provide a "built-in" option when installing a new O/S:
    restoring the settings, making the old system the "boot-system", and copying bootmgr from the new system to the old.
    That should save a lot of people from problems, especially when they have installed beta-versions...

    You can use fx. EasyBCD and make the "old" system the "boot-system" (active) again,
    and then copy bootmgr from the "new" system to the "old" system.

    That should be simple to do with a script...

  7. #7
    whs's Avatar
    whs
    whs is offline Gold Member
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    I run Windows 10 in VMwarePlayer. That's a lot easier and safer for such an early version of a system. For details see here. This is my own tutorial. If you have questions, post back.
    Last edited by whs; 13th March 2015 at 04:42.

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