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Thread: An experiment

  1. #1
    seti is offline Member
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    Default An experiment

    A few years ago a man walked along the street of a city with a badge and a clip board in wearing a suit. He walked up to complete strangers and said, without proving it, that he was from their bank and he needed to check their details. It did not matter what bank they account was with he just asked. Over 75% he asked gave thier details without questioning him, the others questioned him and refused to give the details, knowing that their bank would not send someone to the street to check on them, but would ask them when they went into the bank or send them a letter. His name was Apsm. Nowdays Apsm has a different name, and no matter how many times people are warned about his activities, he still manages to get details from the unwise. So why this post here, because apsm could be sending an emailto you right now, are you prepared to say no. Check out the latest security updates and you will be and never answer any emails from "your bank" asking for your details they already know them, or apsm could just take more than your details he could take everything


  2. #2
    Corrine's Avatar
    Corrine is offline Gold Member
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    Excellent advice, Seti.

    Although not a person with a clipboard, consider this scenario --

    When I got home from work the other day, there was a telephone message to call "XYZ Credit Card Company" at a toll-free number and to have the details of the account available.

    Whoa! Anyone can purchase a toll-free number, make random calls and leave a similar message. If they hit a person with an "XYZ" card and get their credit card number, they are off and running.

    Rather than calling the toll-free number, I located an old statement and telephoned customer service. As it turns out, it had been a legitimate call. The representative informed me that an important letter had been sent out to account holders and they were calling to provide the details.

    I explained my concerns about their process regarding identity theft and the customer service representative asked if I had any suggestions. I told the person that it would have been easy enough to include the information in the message regarding the letter and suggesting that additional information could be obtained by calling the toll-free number or the Customer Service number on the statement. She said she would take my suggestions "under advisement".

    Bottom line -- be cautious if you receive a similar telephone call. If you did not initiate the call, do not give out any personal information. Instead, tell the caller that you will telephone customer service directly.

  3. #3
    JonPaulOnLine's Avatar
    JonPaulOnLine is offline Windows Enthusiast
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    Thank you Corrine
    Thats a very good tip

  4. #4
    leofelix is offline Member
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    I'm lucky,. my Bank never send me mails

  5. #5
    nitinagarwal1988's Avatar
    nitinagarwal1988 is offline Microsoft MVP
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    thanks for informing, but i think banks also have to take some precautions and take some responsible steps to avoid such type of scams.....

  6. #6
    Corrine's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, nitinagarwal1988, the banks cannot protect us against ourselves.

  7. #7
    terrybabbs's Avatar
    terrybabbs is offline New Member
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    Even if a person wears a decent clothing and admits he/she is a bank representative I wouldn't easily give in my personal information especially bank accounts.

  8. #8
    Elmer B.'s Avatar
    Elmer B. is offline Windows Enthusiast
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    Quote Originally Posted by leofelix View Post
    I'm lucky,. my Bank never send me mails
    My bank's emailing me all the time asking for "their" 1000 overdraft back.
    Dunno why they're getting uppity. Just because they've had no salary going in for 2 months!!

  9. #9
    alexlloyd5's Avatar
    alexlloyd5 is offline Beginner
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    most of "apsm" guys know very well that alot of people are cautious, but they bet on those who are Innocent, so out of 20 or 30 people whom they try their tricks with, they might come out with let's say 5 victims, which is a good number.

    My bank increased the security precautions on their web site cause someone was sending e-mails and sms messages asking the clients to go to the bank's page (it was an exact copy of the original bank's site with dot net instead of dot com!)


    btw. i belong to the cautious group, never been innocent in my life

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